security (16)


Adding click-jacking and cross-site scripting protection

Two of the common found vulnerabilities found by the OWASP ZAP tool are missing X-Frame-Options and X-XSS-Protection response header values. These go some way to prevent clickjacking and cross-site scripting attacks. The fix is to add headers refs to the web server confirmation files. Below is example for Nginx (nginx.conf):

server { ...
location / {
add_header X-Content-Type-Options nosniff;
add_header X-XSS-Protection "1; mode=block";
add_header X-Frame-Options "SAMEORIGIN" always;
}
}




OWASP Dependency-Check Plugin on Jenkins CI

The OWASP Dependency-Check Plugin will locate npm, maven, php, jar packages and analysze them for known security vulnerabilities (full support list is on the website). To use, you need to create a build step on the app build job you have, after all dependencies installed, then publish the report in a post-build step.




OWASP ZAP on Jenkins CI

OWASP ZAP is a very established and useful test tool, and there is a Jenkins plugin ZAProxy to enable you to easily include it in CI.  You can add it as a step to an exiting job, and create a job specifically to run ZAP.  Instead of using a lot of screenshots, I have done it as a step-by-step text-only guide.




End-users as security testers

Increasingly security testing of web applications are left to the end-user to discover. The web is generally seen as an imperfect thing, so it is not surprising that most users do not expect a website that works well 100%. What I have seen on the best Agile and Lean projects, is this is omitted to much further down the cycle, if at all – but why? Yes, they are skilled testing areas (and hence higher cost to secure fully skilled resource), but there is a lot that can be done, with the right tools and approach.




Zed Attack Proxy – Intercepting Traffic and Modifying with Breakpoints

[youtube width=”640″ height=”480″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXoJQz6uIQ0[/youtube]